FILM  •  MUSEUM  • EDUCATION •  INTERACTIVE  •  BOOK  •  CONTACT

TheAnthropoceneProject_white_600px

Since the Late Pleistocene Humans Were Already Radically Transforming the Earth

June 7, 2016

By Jackson Landers | Smithsonian Magazine | June 7, 2016 “The idea of trying to restore things to a pristine state is not possible,” says Melinda Zeder, senior research scientist and curator of old world archaeology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “Humans are very much a part of nature,” Zeder says. “The ways in…

Read More

‘Pristine’ landscapes haven’t existed for thousands of years due to human activity

June 7, 2016

Science Bulletin | June 7, 2016 ‘Pristine’ landscapes simply do not exist anywhere in the world today and, in most cases, have not existed for at least several thousand years, says a new study in the journal,Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences(PNAS). An exhaustive review of archaeological data from the last 30 years provides…

Read More

Success! U.S. Effectively Bans Ivory Trade

June 2, 2016

By Andrew Harmon | WildAid | June 2, 2016 WASHINGTON (June 2, 2016) — In a bold effort to save Africa’s elephants, the Obama Administration has released strong, clear rules aimed at effectively shutting down the U.S. ivory market, one of the world’s largest. Released Thursday, the final Endangered Species Act special rule for the African elephant substantially limits…

Read More

Coral Bleaching in The Great Barrier Reef

May 26, 2016

This month the #Anthropocene film team visited Australia to observe coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef. pic.twitter.com/gBtpGEkYKW — Anthropocene Project (@anthropocene) May 26, 2016

Read More

Cloud-Seeding Surprise Could Improve Climate Predictions

May 26, 2016

By Davide Castelvecchio | Scientific American | May 26, 2016 Molecules released by trees can seed clouds, two experiments have revealed. The findings, published on May 25 in Nature and Science, run contrary to an assumption that the pollutant sulphuric acid is required for a certain type of cloud formation—and suggest that climate predictions may have underestimated the role that…

Read More

Are We in the Anthropocene Yet?

May 23, 2016

By Zach St. George | Nautilus | May 23, 2016 In the early 1990s, a few miles west of El Kef, a town in Tunisia, geologists set a small golden spike in between two layers of clay that remains there to this day. They wanted to mark the tiny yet striking layer of iridium—a hard, dense, silvery-white…

Read More

Coal made its best case against climate change, and lost

May 11, 2016

By Dana Nuccitelli | The Guardian | May 11, 2016 Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private sector coal company (now bankrupt), recently faced off against environmental groups in a Minnesota court case. The case was to determine whether the State of Minnesota should continue using its exceptionally low established estimates of the ‘social cost of carbon’, or…

Read More

First report of all the world’s plants finds 1 in 5 species facing extinction

May 10, 2016

By Ben Guarino | The Washington Post | May 10, 2016 Plants pervade almost every part of human life — not only do we eat them and wear them, we use plants for fuel, medicine, building materials, poisons and intoxicants. To limit the world’s plants to those that meet a human need, however, would be doing the leafy kingdom a…

Read More

How Rising CO2 Levels May Contribute to Die-Off of Bees

May 10, 2016

By Lisa Palmer | Yale Environment 360 | May 10, 2016 Specimens of goldenrod sewn into archival paper folders are stacked floor to ceiling inside metal cabinets at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The collection, housed in the herbarium, dates back to 1842 and is among five million historical records of plants from around…

Read More

Explaining the Anthropocene: Ian Angus on how human activity is transforming the entire planet

May 6, 2016

By Ian Angus | Socialist Review | May 6, 2016 Anthropocene is the proposed name for the present stage of Earth history: a time in which human activity is transforming the entire planet in unprecedented and dangerous ways. Scientists divide Earth’s 4.5 billion year history into time intervals that correspond to major changes in the conditions…

Read More

Fort McMurray and the Fires of Climate Change

May 5, 2016

By Elizabeth Kolbert | The New Yorker | May 5, 2016 The town of Fort McMurray, some four hundred miles north of Calgary, in Canada, grew up very quickly on both sides of the Athabasca River. During the nineteen-seventies, the population of the town tripled, and since then it has nearly tripled again. All this growth…

Read More

Spending Some Time at Ol Pejeta

May 4, 2016

Spending some time at @OlPejeta with Sudan, the last remaining male northern white rhino. pic.twitter.com/W8HUdJj8ih — Anthropocene Project (@anthropocene) May 4, 2016 Learn more about the Northern White Rhinos at Ol Pejeta, HERE.

Read More

The KWS Ivory Burn – A Sneak Peek of Our Drone Footage

May 1, 2016

On Saturday, April 30, 2016 the Anthropocene team was in Nairobi National Park among African officials, celebrities and passionate citizens to document the burning of the largest stockpile of elephant ivory and rhino horn in history. We are deeply grateful to the Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Film Commission and the High Commission of Canada for their efforts to…

Read More

The Historic KWS Ivory Burn

April 30, 2016

The KWS Ivory Burn – Curated tweets by anthropocene  

Read More

ESSAY: Ghosts and tiny treasures

April 28, 2016

By Bryan Pfeiffer | Aeon Ten years ago this spring, in the darkness before dawn, I switched on my headlamp, dialled in my compass, and set forth into a chilly Arkansas swamp. Dressed head to toe in camouflage and lugging an arsenal of camera gear, I wandered alone that day through lowlands of oak, cypress and sycamore,…

Read More

Telefilm, Rogers invest $1.6M across six docs

April 27, 2016

By Camille Gushy | Playback | April 27, 2016 Anthropocene (pictured) from Jennifer Baichwal and Edward Burtynsky was among the projects to receive funding through the Theatrical Documentary Program. Read more on Playback.

Read More

Women filmmakers in the spotlight as Telefilm Canada and the Rogers Group of Funds announce their support of six homegrown theatrical documentaries

April 26, 2016

Telefilm Canada | April 26, 2016 Including documentaries by Academy Award-winning director Brigitte Berman, acclaimed writer-directors Jennifer Baichwal, Julie Lambert and Ann Shin, and veteran producers Trish Dolman and Betsy Carson. Read the full release on Telefilm.ca.

Read More

Just 7% of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef Escapes Bleaching

April 20, 2016

BBC News | April 20, 2016 An extensive aerial and underwater survey has revealed that 93% of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has been affected by coral bleaching. This follows earlier warnings that the reef was experiencing its worst coral bleaching event on record. Prof Terry Hughes from the National Coral Bleaching Taskforce told the BBC the link between…

Read More

Changing the Face of the Earth

April 12, 2016

By Dr. Colin Waters | LaboratoryNews | April 12, 2016 We have geo-engineered the Earth expertly for our own ends, but will humanity’s indelible stamp on the planet define an entire geological epoch? The term “Anthropocene” was coined by Paul Crutzen 16 years ago to mark the present as distinct from previous geological time. The term has…

Read More

Evolving Toward a Better Anthropocene

April 4, 2016

By Erle Ellis | The Breakthrough Institute | April 4, 2016 Humans have now transformed Earth to such a degree that a new epoch of geologic time, the Anthropocene, may soon mark the emergence of humanity as a “great force of nature.” The big question is why? Why did humans, and no other single multicellular species…

Read More

Kenyan Wildlife Authorities Prepare to Torch Ivory to Deter Poaching

April 4, 2016

By Ben Curtis | The Globe and Mail | April 4, 2016 Kenyan wildlife authorities Monday started moving at least 105 tons of ivory and one ton of rhino horn in preparation for the torching of the items at the end of the month to discourage ivory and rhino-horn trade believed to be fuelling poaching of…

Read More

Technofossil Beach

April 2, 2016

Technofossil beach, Fort Bragg, California pic.twitter.com/MnlffdUnxP — Anthropocene Project (@anthropocene) April 2, 2016

Read More

Generation Anthropocene: How Humans Have Altered the Planet for Ever

April 1, 2016

By Robert Macfarlane | The Guardian | April 1, 2016 In 2003 the Australian philosopher Glenn Albrecht coined the term solastalgiato mean a “form of psychic or existential distress caused by environmental change”. Albrecht was studying the effects of long-term drought and large-scale mining activity on communities in New South Wales, when he realised that no word…

Read More

Is It Game Over for Coal?

March 18, 2016

By Emma Foehringer Merchant | New Republic | March 18, 2016 Last Friday, Oregon became the first state to ban coal outright, passing a bill that will phase out any electricity generated by coal by 2035. Several days earlier, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that 80 percent of last year’s retired electricity was coal-powered. In 2016, natural gas…

Read More

The Early Anthropocene Hypothesis: An Update

March 15, 2016

By Bill Ruddiman | RealClimate | March 15, 2016 For over a decade, paleoclimate scientists have argued whether the warmth of the last several thousand years was natural or anthropogenic. This brief comment updates that debate, also discussed earlier at RC: Debate over the Early Anthropogenic Hypothesis (2005) and An Emerging View on Early Land Use (2011). The graph…

Read More

The Case for Optimism on Climate Change | Al Gore TED 2016

March 14, 2016

Why is Al Gore optimistic about climate change? In this spirited talk, Gore asks three powerful questions about the man-made forces threatening to destroy our planet — and the solutions we’re designing to combat them. (Featuring Q&A with TED Curator Chris Anderson)

Read More

Anthropocene: The Human Age

March 11, 2016

By Richard Monastersky | Nature | March 11, 2016 Almost all the dinosaurs have vanished from the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. The fossil hall is now mostly empty and painted in deep shadows as palaeobiologist Scott Wing wanders through the cavernous room. Wing is part of a team carrying out a radical,…

Read More

Satellite Laser Will Map Forests in 3-D

March 8, 2016

By Brittany Patterson | Scientific American | March 8, 2016 In 2018, America’s space agency is going to send a laser into the galaxies to assess the world’s trees. It won’t be the first time NASA dabbles in lidar technology—shooting lasers onto things and recording what comes back—but it will be the first time the agency…

Read More

NASA Finds Drought in Eastern Mediterranean Worst of Past 900 Years

March 1, 2016

NASA | March 1, 2016 In addition to identifying the driest years, the science team discovered patterns in the geographic distribution of droughts that provides a “fingerprint” for identifying the underlying causes. Together, these data show the range of natural variation in Mediterranean drought occurrence, which will allow scientists to differentiate droughts made worse by…

Read More

In Search of the Anthropocene Epoch

February 26, 2016

BBC News | February 26, 2016 For more than 11,000 years, we have been living in a period of geological time called the Holocene. But researchers say our planet is undergoing a rapid transition, so much so that we have shifted into a new epoch: the Anthropocene, the age of humans. Continue reading and watch…

Read More