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Massive mangrove die-off on Gulf of Carpentaria worst in the world, says expert

July 11, 2016

By Michael Slezak | The Guardian | July 11, 2016 Climate change and El Niño have caused the worst mangrove die-off in recorded history, stretching along 700km of Australia’s Gulf of Carpentaria, an expert says. The mass die-off coincided with the world’s worst global coral bleaching event, as well as the worst bleaching event on the Great…

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On Location in Shandong

July 6, 2016

RT @nickdepencier: @edwardburtynsky & the mighty Noah Weinzweig on location in Shandong filming @anthropocene. pic.twitter.com/dAZWBobwpf — Anthropocene Film (@anthropocene) July 6, 2016

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African wildlife officials appalled as EU opposes a total ban on ivory trade

July 6, 2016

By Andrew Nelsen | The Guardian | July 6, 2016 Wildlife officials in nearly 30 African states say they are appalled by an EU decision to oppose a comprehensive global ban on the ivory trade. In a position paper released on 1 July, the European commission said that rather than an all-encompassing ban it would be better to encourage…

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Government of Canada labels microbeads ‘toxic substance’

June 30, 2016

Via The Canadian Press | The Globe and Mail | June 30, 2016 The federal government has officially listed microbeads as a toxic substance, giving it the ability to ban the plastic beads used in cleansers. An online notice published Wednesday says the tiny plastic beads commonly found in facial and body scrubs is now listed as…

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Humanity Is Killing Off Thousands of Species. But It’s Creating Them, Too

June 28, 2016

  By Lizzie Wade | Wired | June 28, 2016 DURING WORLD WAR II, Londoners often sought shelter from German bombs in the city’s subway tunnels. There, they encountered another type of enemy: hordes of voracious mosquitoes. These weren’t your typical aboveground mosquitoes. They were natives of the metro, born in pools of standing water that pockmarked…

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3D printing could save our coral reefs

June 28, 2016

By Ronan Ye | 3D Printing Industry | June 28, 2016 Most of the environmental changes in the present times are taking the earth closer to the loss of biodiversity. Environmentalists are worried that the vast coral reefs under the ocean are subject to risk of extinction in the coming years. Hence, any program undertaken…

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Can Virtual Reality Emerge As a Tool for Conservation?

June 27, 2016

By Heather Millar | Yale Environment360 | June 27, 2016 Could virtual reality (VR) — immersive digital experiences that mimic reality — save the environment? Well, that may be a bit of a stretch. But researchers say that it could perhaps promote better understanding of nature and give people empathetic insight into environmental challenges. “Virtual reality can…

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Another Threat to Tuna: Ocean Acidification

June 22, 2016

By John R. Platt | Scientific American | June 22, 2016 More acidic oceans could soon start dissolving tuna fish as they swim, long before they make it to consumers’ plates. This worrying news comes from a study published last month in the Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology which found that increasing acidification in the Pacific…

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‘Finding Dory’ Could Lead to Dangerous Demand for Blue Tangs as Pets

June 22, 2016

By Brent Lang | Variety | June 22, 2016 “Finding Nemo” centers on an adorable clownfish who is separated from his father before being reunited to live out his days, swimming wild and free in his ocean home. The success of the 2003 film created a huge demand for the finned cuties, as fans of the…

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Plastiglomerate: The New And Horrible Way Humans Are Leaving Their Mark On The Planet

June 19, 2016

By Carla Herreria | The Huffington Post | June 19, 2016 Humans will now be forever inscribed into the Earth’s geological history. Our everlasting signature? Plastic-infused stones. The newly identified stone, according to a report from The Geological Society of America, has been officially named plastiglomerate. It is formed when plastic trash melts and fuses together with…

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Podcast: On the Way to Peak Phosphorus

June 17, 2016

By Generation Anthropocene | Smithsonian.com | June 17, 2016 Phosphorus is an essential element to life on earth, but it’s not distributed equally, to say the least. Geologic deposits of phosphorus are concentrated in just five countries, and experts say the rate at which we’re consuming it is unsustainable, predicting we may reach peak phosphorus this century…

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Venice has unusually high levels of water but the locals are getting on just fine

June 17, 2016

By Harley Tamplin | Metro.co.uk | June 17, 2016 If there’s one place in the world that should cope fine with some flash flooding, it’s Venice. That’s the case in the beautiful Italian city at the moment – and judging by the pictures, the locals don’t seem to mind. There are unusually high levels of water as…

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Seven climate records set so far in 2016

June 17, 2016

By Adam Vaughan | The Guardian | June 17, 2016 From soaring temperatures in Alaska and India to Arctic sea ice melting and CO2 concentrations rising, this year is smashing records around the world  Continue reading on The Guardian.

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“Smartest Person,” “Anthropocene” receive Bell Fund cash

June 14, 2016

The Bell Fund has distributed CDN$6.4 million (US$5.04 million) across 39 broadcast and digital media projects. Unscripted English-language broadcast and digi projects to receive funding from the fund’s production program include Mercury Films’ feature documentary Anthropocene (TMN, TVO); Little Engine Moving Pictures’ Canada Crew (TVO); season three of Canada’s Smartest Person (pictured, CBC), from Media Headquarters Film & Television; marblemedia’s Driving Me…

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Biggest US coal company funded dozens of groups questioning climate change

June 13, 2016

By Suzanne Goldenberg and Helena Bengtssen | The Guardian | June 13, 2016 Peabody Energy, America’s biggest coalmining company, has funded at least two dozen groups that cast doubt on manmade climate change and oppose environment regulations, analysis by the Guardian reveals. The funding spanned trade associations, corporate lobby groups, and industry front groups as well as…

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Bell Fund – May 2016 Funding Decisions

June 10, 2016

The Board of Directors of the Bell Fund has announced its decisions for the May 2, 2016 round of applications. Over $6.4M in grants has been approved for 39 of the 60 (English and French) applications received, as follows: The following English language projects received Production Grants under the Bell Fund’s Production Program: Continue reading on Bellfund.ca.

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Since the Late Pleistocene Humans Were Already Radically Transforming the Earth

June 7, 2016

By Jackson Landers | Smithsonian Magazine | June 7, 2016 “The idea of trying to restore things to a pristine state is not possible,” says Melinda Zeder, senior research scientist and curator of old world archaeology at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. “Humans are very much a part of nature,” Zeder says. “The ways in…

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Success! U.S. Effectively Bans Ivory Trade

June 2, 2016

By Andrew Harmon | WildAid | June 2, 2016 WASHINGTON (June 2, 2016) — In a bold effort to save Africa’s elephants, the Obama Administration has released strong, clear rules aimed at effectively shutting down the U.S. ivory market, one of the world’s largest. Released Thursday, the final Endangered Species Act special rule for the African elephant substantially limits…

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Coral Bleaching in The Great Barrier Reef

May 26, 2016

This month the #Anthropocene film team visited Australia to observe coral bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef. pic.twitter.com/gBtpGEkYKW — Anthropocene Project (@anthropocene) May 26, 2016

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Cloud-Seeding Surprise Could Improve Climate Predictions

May 26, 2016

By Davide Castelvecchio | Scientific American | May 26, 2016 Molecules released by trees can seed clouds, two experiments have revealed. The findings, published on May 25 in Nature and Science, run contrary to an assumption that the pollutant sulphuric acid is required for a certain type of cloud formation—and suggest that climate predictions may have underestimated the role that…

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Are We in the Anthropocene Yet?

May 23, 2016

By Zach St. George | Nautilus | May 23, 2016 In the early 1990s, a few miles west of El Kef, a town in Tunisia, geologists set a small golden spike in between two layers of clay that remains there to this day. They wanted to mark the tiny yet striking layer of iridium—a hard, dense, silvery-white…

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Coal made its best case against climate change, and lost

May 11, 2016

By Dana Nuccitelli | The Guardian | May 11, 2016 Peabody Energy, the world’s largest private sector coal company (now bankrupt), recently faced off against environmental groups in a Minnesota court case. The case was to determine whether the State of Minnesota should continue using its exceptionally low established estimates of the ‘social cost of carbon’, or…

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First report of all the world’s plants finds 1 in 5 species facing extinction

May 10, 2016

By Ben Guarino | The Washington Post | May 10, 2016 Plants pervade almost every part of human life — not only do we eat them and wear them, we use plants for fuel, medicine, building materials, poisons and intoxicants. To limit the world’s plants to those that meet a human need, however, would be doing the leafy kingdom a…

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How Rising CO2 Levels May Contribute to Die-Off of Bees

May 10, 2016

By Lisa Palmer | Yale Environment 360 | May 10, 2016 Specimens of goldenrod sewn into archival paper folders are stacked floor to ceiling inside metal cabinets at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History. The collection, housed in the herbarium, dates back to 1842 and is among five million historical records of plants from around…

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Explaining the Anthropocene: Ian Angus on how human activity is transforming the entire planet

May 6, 2016

By Ian Angus | Socialist Review | May 6, 2016 Anthropocene is the proposed name for the present stage of Earth history: a time in which human activity is transforming the entire planet in unprecedented and dangerous ways. Scientists divide Earth’s 4.5 billion year history into time intervals that correspond to major changes in the conditions…

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Fort McMurray and the Fires of Climate Change

May 5, 2016

By Elizabeth Kolbert | The New Yorker | May 5, 2016 The town of Fort McMurray, some four hundred miles north of Calgary, in Canada, grew up very quickly on both sides of the Athabasca River. During the nineteen-seventies, the population of the town tripled, and since then it has nearly tripled again. All this growth…

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Spending Some Time at Ol Pejeta

May 4, 2016

Spending some time at @OlPejeta with Sudan, the last remaining male northern white rhino. pic.twitter.com/W8HUdJj8ih — Anthropocene Project (@anthropocene) May 4, 2016 Learn more about the Northern White Rhinos at Ol Pejeta, HERE.

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The KWS Ivory Burn – A Sneak Peek of Our Drone Footage

May 1, 2016

On Saturday, April 30, 2016 the Anthropocene team was in Nairobi National Park among African officials, celebrities and passionate citizens to document the burning of the largest stockpile of elephant ivory and rhino horn in history. We are deeply grateful to the Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya Film Commission and the High Commission of Canada for their efforts to…

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The Historic KWS Ivory Burn

April 30, 2016

The KWS Ivory Burn – Curated tweets by anthropocene  

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ESSAY: Ghosts and tiny treasures

April 28, 2016

By Bryan Pfeiffer | Aeon Ten years ago this spring, in the darkness before dawn, I switched on my headlamp, dialled in my compass, and set forth into a chilly Arkansas swamp. Dressed head to toe in camouflage and lugging an arsenal of camera gear, I wandered alone that day through lowlands of oak, cypress and sycamore,…

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