TheAnthropoceneProject_white_600px

What really happened to mammoths and other ice age giants

November 2, 2016

By Niki Rust | BBC Earth  There might be as many as 10 million species of complex life on this planet today – a huge number. But add up all of the complex species that ever lived and some biologists think the grand total would be about five billion. The estimate leads to an astonishing conclusion:…

Read More

As Earth Warms, the Diseases That May Lie Within Permafrost Become a Bigger Worry

October 30, 2016

By Sara Goudarzi | Scientific American This past summer anthrax killed a 12-year-old boy in a remote part of Siberia. At least 20 other people, also from the Yamal Peninsula, were diagnosed with the potentially deadly disease after approximately 100 suspected cases were hospitalized. Additionally, more than 2,300 reindeer in the area died from the infection.…

Read More

Wildlife populations plunge almost 60 percent since 1970: WWF

October 26, 2016

By Alister Doyle | Reuters Worldwide populations of mammals, birds, fish, amphibians and reptiles have plunged by almost 60 percent since 1970 as human activities overwhelm the environment, the WWF conservation group said on Thursday. An index compiled with data from the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) to measure the abundance of biodiversity was down 58 percent…

Read More

The Mangrove Finch: An Extinction in Slow Motion

October 19, 2016

By John R. Platt | Scientific American One of Charles Darwin’s fabled finch species is slowly disappearing, even as conservationists work desperately to save it. This “slow-motion extinction,” as a newly published paper puts it, concerns the critically endangered mangrove finch (Camarhynchus heliobates). Native to the Galápagos Islands, the species has found itself plagued by invasive…

Read More

Understand The World Better With This Illustrated User’s Guide To The Anthropocene

October 17, 2016

  By Adele Peters | FastCo Exist Two decades ago, scientist James Lovelock imagined what the last book on earth should look like: a post-apocalyptic survival guide that explains the basics of the planet, why it collapsed, and how to avoid recreating the same mistakes. The idea morphed into something a little more helpful, a book we…

Read More

UN: Global agriculture needs a ‘profound transformation’ to fight climate change and protect food security

October 17, 2016

By Chelsea Harvey | The Washington Post Climate change has already begun to affect the world’s food production, a new report from the United Nations warns — and unless significant action is taken, it could put millions more people at risk of hunger and poverty in the next few decades. It’s a message that’s been emphasized over and over…

Read More

Breakage of monumental B.C. iceberg quietly sounds climate change alarm

October 12, 2016

By Mark Hume | The Globe and Mail A massive chunk of ice – thought to be the largest iceberg to ever break off a glacier in Canada – fell into a lake in British Columbia this summer and no one noticed until a U.S. scientist saw it on a NASA photo. Dr. Mauri Pelto, professor…

Read More

The world passes 400ppm carbon dioxide threshold. Permanently

September 28, 2016

By Brian Kahn | The Guardian In the centuries to come, history books will likely look back on September 2016 as a major milestone for the world’s climate. At a time when atmospheric carbon dioxide is usually at its minimum, the monthly value failed to drop below 400 parts per million (ppm). That all but ensures…

Read More

Limiting the Planet to 1.5 Degrees C of Warming Is Crucial, but It Won’t Be Easy

September 26, 2016

By Clive Hamilton | Scientific American Astonishment was universal last December when the Paris Agreement on climate change included the aspiration to limit warming to 1.5° C above pre-industrial levels, a much tougher target than the standard of 2°, now seen as too risky. It was a remarkable triumph for a long campaign by the small…

Read More

WWF Scorecard shows which companies kept their promises to consumers on palm oil

September 21, 2016

By WWF Gland, Switzerland. While many palm oil buyers are taking the right actions on palm oil, some have failed to keep their promises to consumers or are still doing nothing at all to help reduce deforestation and other adverse impacts of producing the world’s most popular vegetable oil in some of the most vulnerable tropical…

Read More

375 top scientists warn of ‘real, serious, immediate’ climate threat

September 21, 2016

By John Abraham | The Guardian Yesterday, 375 of the world’s top scientists, including 30 Nobel Prize winners, published an open letter regarding climate change. In the letter, the scientists report that the evidence is clear: humans are causing climate change. We are now observing climate change and its affect across the globe. The seas are rising,…

Read More

Thanks to Mega for bringing awareness to The Anthropocene Project

September 12, 2016

Our new film is out! Watch @edwardburtynsky discuss his upcoming documentary the @anthropocene. #photography #art https://t.co/aWnGfKBpYo — Mega (@megaonline) September 12, 2016

Read More

‘Our living dinosaurs’ There are far fewer African elephants than we thought, study shows

August 31, 2016

By David McKenzie and Ingrid Formanek | CNN | August 31, 2016 Linyanti Swamp, Botswana (CNN)Scanning Botswana’s remote Linyanti swamp from the low flying chopper, elephant ecologist Mike Chase can’t hide the anxiety and dread as he sees what he has seen too many times before. “I don’t think anybody in the world has seen the number of…

Read More

One of the World’s Biggest Fisheries Is on the Verge of Collapse

August 29, 2016

By Rachael Bale | National Geographic | August 29, 2016 PUERTO PRINCESA, PHILIPPINESYears ago Christopher Tubo caught a 660-pound blue marlin in the South China Sea. The fishing was good there, he says. Tuna fishermen would come home from a trip with dozens of the high-value fish as well as a good haul of other species.…

Read More

Ocean Slime Spreading Quickly Across the Earth

August 19, 2016

By Craig Welch | National Geographic | August 19, 2016 When sea lions suffered seizures and birds and porpoises started dying on the California coast last year, scientists weren’t entirely surprised. Toxic algae is known to harm marine mammals. But when researchers found enormous amounts of toxin in a pelican that had been slurping anchovies, they decided to…

Read More

Giant Coral Reef in Protected Area Shows New Signs of Life

August 15, 2016

By Karen Weintraub | The New York Times | August 15, 2016 In 2003, researchers declared Coral Castles dead. On the floor of a remote island lagoon halfway between Hawaii and Fiji, the giant reef site had been devastated by unusually warm water. Its remains looked like a pile of drab dinner plates tossed into the…

Read More

World Elephant Day

August 12, 2016

It's #WorldElephantDay & we are remembering the @kwskenya Ivory Burn as a powerful statement against the ivory trade pic.twitter.com/bL4sLzJKpG — Anthropocene Film (@anthropocene) August 12, 2016

Read More

Fixing water quality for Great Barrier Reef will cost $8.2bn, report finds

August 12, 2016

By Michael Slezak | The Guardian | August 12, 2016 Attempting to fix the water quality for the Great Barrier Reef will cost $8.2bn in the next decade but even then some of the targets will be impossible to meet, according to a landmark report commissioned by the Queensland government. The targets are part of the federal government’s…

Read More

More than 60% of Maldives’ coral reefs hit by bleaching

August 8, 2016

The Guardian | August 8, 2016 More than 60% of coral in reefs in the Maldives has been hit by “bleaching” as the world is gripped by record temperatures in 2016, a scientific survey suggests. Bleaching happens when algae that lives in the coral is expelled due to stress caused by extreme and sustained changes in temperatures,…

Read More

Thaw could release U.S. toxic waste buried under Greenland’s ice

August 5, 2016

OSLO – Reuters | The Globe and Mail | August 5, 2016 Global warming could release radioactive waste stored in an abandoned Cold War-era U.S. military camp deep under Greenland’s ice caps if a thaw continues to spread in coming decades, scientists said on Friday. Camp Century was built in northwest Greenland in 1959 as part…

Read More

Anthrax Outbreak In Russia Thought To Be Result Of Thawing Permafrost

August 3, 2016

By Michaeleen Doucleff | NPR.org| August 3, 2016 Russia is fighting a mysterious anthrax outbreak in a remote corner of Siberia. Dozens of people have been hospitalized; one child has died. The government airlifted some families out because more than 2,000 reindeer have been infected. Officials don’t know exactly how the outbreak started, but the…

Read More

Do the World’s Three Remaining Northern White Rhinos Have a Future?

July 28, 2016

By Rachel Nuwer | PBS NatureNOW | July 28, 2016 Sudan is the last of his kind on Earth. He just looks like a rhino. But as his keeper will quickly inform you, he is one of just three northern white rhinos remaining on the planet. The other two, a mother-daughter pair named Najin and Fatu,…

Read More

Slimy Green Beaches May Be Florida’s New Normal

July 27, 2016

By Laura Parker | National Geographic | July 27, 2016 The green slime that washed onto Florida beaches earlier this month marks the eighth time since 2004 that toxic algae have fouled the Sunshine State’s storied coastline. The algae blooms of 2013 were so severe the event became known as Toxic Summer. And this year’s outbreak…

Read More

PODCAST: The Survivor

July 26, 2016

By Leslie Chang | Generation Anthropocene | July 26, 2016 The solenodon: a venomous, shrew-like mammal, found only in the Caribbean, that has survived for millions of years by hiding underground. Even the meteor that wiped out the dinosaurs 66 million years ago couldn’t kill this hardy little creature. But after surviving for so long, after…

Read More

De-Extinction in Action: Scientists Consider a Plan to Reinject Long-Gone DNA into the Black-Footed Ferret Population

July 22, 2016

By David Biello | Scientific American | August 1, 2016 In 1987 only 18 black-footed ferrets were known to exist, but thanks to captive breeding and intensive management, the animals are a few hundred strong now. Yet like many species that bounce back from such small numbers, all the individuals are basically half-siblings—genetic near clones, with…

Read More

Sad news from Ol Pejeta – R.I.P. Ringo

July 20, 2016

Sad news from @OlPejeta today. R.I.P. Ringo. pic.twitter.com/IgVwsLxu5K — Anthropocene Film (@anthropocene) July 20, 2016

Read More

Extinction is forever: de-extinction can’t save what we had

July 19, 2016

By Brian Switek | Aeon | July 19, 2016 When I hike up into the hills around Salt Lake City, above the Bonneville Shoreline Trail where the sagebrush gives way to the shade of the forest, mastodons are on my mind. Immense bones pulled from a sinkhole on the nearby Wasatch Plateau placed Mammut americanum in the area about…

Read More

More from Shandong

July 12, 2016

Last week on location in Shandong with @nickdepencier, @edwardburtynsky and @noahweinzweig. 📷: Cloud Zhibin Wang pic.twitter.com/PtP1qjBlbG — Anthropocene Film (@anthropocene) July 12, 2016 On location in Shandong, China last week shooting for @anthropocene. Thanks to Cloud Zhibin Wang for the photo. pic.twitter.com/mG0qHBfAz8 — Edward Burtynsky (@edwardburtynsky) July 12, 2016

Read More

China denied: What Tuesday’s ruling means for Beijing’s maritime ambitions

July 12, 2016

By Mark MacKinnon | The Globe and Mail | July 12, 2016 An international court in The Hague has dealt a major blow to China’s claim of sovereignty over most of the South China Sea, ruling that Beijing had “no historical rights” over the resource-rich and hotly disputed waters. In a long-awaited ruling published Tuesday, the Permanent Court…

Read More

‘Shocking images’ reveal death of 10,000 hectares of mangroves across Northern Australia

July 11, 2016

By Kate Wild | ABC | July 11, 2016 Close to 10,000 hectares of mangroves have died across a stretch of coastline reaching from Queensland to the Northern Territory. Key points: A mangrove expert says it is the most extreme “dieback” he has ever seen The mangrove death occurred across a 700km stretch of NT and…

Read More