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Review: Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is both meditative and urgent

September 26, 2018

By Kevin Ritchie NOW Toronto NNNN The third collaboration between director Baichwal, photographer Burtynsky and DP de Pencier (now billed as co-director) continues the trio’s large-scale visual exploration of environmental change and degradation, but in the context of scientific research showing that we have moved into a new geological epoch defined by human activity. Read…

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Anthropocene reveals the scale of Earth’s existential crisis

September 26, 2018

By Kevin Ritchie NOW Toronto Can a geological epoch become a household word? For the last 12,000-odd years, the earth enjoyed the Holocene, the period of stable climate since the end of the last ice age. Nearly two decades ago, scientists popularized the term Anthropocene to describe the new period we are believed to have…

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‘Reconnecting us to the wastelands’: AGO’s new photo exhibit shows what humanity’s doing to the planet

September 26, 2018

By Trevor Dunn | CBC News A new exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario seeks to reveal the way human activity is transforming the planet. Just how the cumulative action of seven billion people is shaping the environment may be difficult, if not impossible, to grasp. But the oversized photographs by Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky…

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Apocalypse Now

September 26, 2018

By Mark Pupo | Toronto Life Over the past 40 years, the photographer Edward Burtynsky has hunted down the world’s largest marble quarries, clear-cut forests and solar power fields. His super-sized shots showcase our ravenous appetite for Earth’s resources—Burtynsky is a war photographer of natural landscapes. For his latest project, Anthropocene, he reunited with his frequent collaborators, filmmakers…

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Living in the Anthropocene, the human epoch

September 19, 2018

By Alexandra Pope | Canadian Geographic Climate change, extinctions, invasive species, the terraforming of land, the redirection of water: all are evidence of the ways human activity has shaped and continues to shape Earth’s natural processes. Scientists have coined a word to describe this unprecedented age of human impact on the planet: the Anthropocene. Although not yet officially…

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Cinefest: Stark warning amidst beauty

September 18, 2018

By Mary Keown | The Sudbury Star  There is a scene in Anthropocene: The Human Epoch during which a man nonchalantly jumps off the ladder of an excavator. It is the largest excavator in the world and as the camera pans outward, you realize just how enormous this piece of equipment really is. This excavator, which…

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Anthropocene’s Three Filmmakers and Ecological Disaster

September 15, 2018

By Susan G. Cole POV Magazine Lights, camera, spectacular success – backlash. So it goes with the films co-created by Ed Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier. The trio is launching Anthropocene, the third in their eco-conscious trilogy that began with Manufactured Landscapes and continued with Watermark, which won the Toronto Critics Film Associations’s best…

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TIFF Review: ‘Anthropocene: The Human Epoch’

September 13, 2018

By Patrick Mullen | Point of View Magazine  Jennifer Baichwal, Edward Burtynsky, Nicholas de Pencier document the devastating consequences of human activity in Anthropocene. In a way, they’ve been documenting it for nearly fifteen years. Anthropocene is the third installment in the team’s epic trilogy of spectacular environmental essay films that began with Manufactured Landscapes (2006) andWatermark (2013). The latest film is…

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Phosphor Tailings Pond #4, Near Lakeland, Florida, USA 2012. A photograph by Edward Burtynsky from The Anthropocene Project

Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is Edward Burtynksy’s Devastating Call to Action

September 10, 2018

By Elizabeth Pagliacolo | Azure Magazine Edward Burtynsky’s new doc (debuting at TIFF) and upcoming exhibition (at the AGO) make the case – through stunning photography – that humans are impacting the Earth more than all natural systems combined. There is a scene in Anthropocene: The Human Epoch where the camera hovers on a concentric circular motif…

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Phosphor Tailings Pond #4, Near Lakeland, Florida, USA 2012. A photograph by Edward Burtynsky from The Anthropocene Project

These photos show just how much damage humans have done to the planet

September 6, 2018

By Adele Peters | Fast Company At the Dandora landfill in Nairobi–which officially shut down in 2012, but where people haven’t stopped dumping trash–some mounds made mostly of plastic bags rise 15 feet high. In Edward Burtynsky’s new photo book, Anthropocene, the landfill represents the idea of “technofossils”–human-made objects, from plastic to mobile phones and cement, that…

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Edward Burtynsky’s Anthropocene premieres at TIFF

September 5, 2018

By Jessica Wei | Post City Toronto The renowned Toronto-based photographer Edward Burtynsky’s career has traced the movement of humans on this earth through the industrial footprint we’ve left on it. Now, his career culminates in his latest work, Anthropocene. The new multi-disciplinary art, publishing and film project, in collaboration with director Jennifer Baichwal and cinematographer Nicholas…

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A Good Anthropocene

September 5, 2018

By Edward Burtynsky As we get closer to the launch of the The Anthropocene Project it’s important to acknowledge some of the positive stories that we’ve documented in the last few years, which have the potential to set us up for #AGoodAnthropocene. But in the face of inevitable human influence on the Earth, what does…

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Alicia Vikander Joins Toronto-Bound Documentary ‘Anthropocene’ As Narrator

September 4, 2018

By Andreas Wiseman | Deadline EXCLUSIVE: Tomb Raider and The Danish Girl star Alicia Vikander has lent her voice to big-canvas documentary Anthropocene: The Human Epoch, which will get its world premiere this week at the Toronto Film Festival. The science-themed doc, from filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier and photographer Edward Burtynsky, contends that human impact on the planet means we have…

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TIFF 2018: Will the wait be worth it for Dolan, Arcand and Burtynsky?

September 3, 2018

By Kate Taylor | The Globe and Mail  It takes money, time and persistence to get a movie made in any country but in Canada the task can feel like moving a mountain. I’m looking forward to the slate of Canadian films at the Toronto International Film Festival this year and in particular I am eager…

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The Haunting Snapshots of an Environment Under Siege

August 30, 2018

By Michael Hardy | WIRED NORILSK, RUSSIA, IS an industrial city of 175,000 people located 200 miles north of the Arctic Circle, a place so far north that it is completely dark for two months every winter. Founded as a Soviet prison labor camp, an estimated 650,000 prisoners were sent here by Stalin between 1935 and 1956; 250,000…

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Edward Burtynsky Captures the ‘Human Signature’ of the Proposed New Anthropocene Era

June 25, 2018

By Kat Barandy | designboom this fall, the canadian photography institute of the national gallery of canada and the art gallery of ontario will co-present ‘anthropocene.’ these two new contemporary art exhibitions tell the story of the human impact on the earth and feature the work of photographer edward burtynsky. in the year 2000, nobel-prize winning chemist paul jozef crutzen first…

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Oil Bunkering #2, Niger Delta, Nigeria 2016. A photograph by Edward Burtynsky from The Anthropocene Project.

Edward Burtynsky unveils preview of Anthropocene project at Photo London

May 17, 2018

By Anny Shaw | The Art Newspaper Much like archaeological eras, the Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky’s projects tend to span long stretches of time. He spent a decade working on his Oil series and five years on the Water project. But, for the past five years, he has been preoccupied by the Anthropocene project, part of…

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Seville International heads to Cannes with ‘Anthropocene’ (exclusive)

May 2, 2018

By Jeremy Kay | Screen Daily Heading into Cannes next week Seville International has boarded worldwide rights to the documentary Anthropocene. The film is co-directed by veteran documentarians Jennifer Baichwal (Long Time Running), Nicholas de Pencier (Black Code) and photographer Edward Burtynsky (Watermark). The third in a series about humanity’s impact on Earth, Anthropocene follows the research by an international…

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Saying Goodbye to Sudan, the Last Male Northern White Rhino

March 20, 2018

It is with heavy hearts that we learn of the passing of Sudan, who was the last male northern white rhino, at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. Species extinction is one of the markers of the #Anthropocene. In May 2016 the #AnthropoceneProject Team had the honour of sharing some intimate moments with Sudan at Ol Pejeta. Sudan’s last days were…

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Burtynsky’s Anthropocene coming to the AGO in September 2018

November 15, 2017

By Kevin Ritchie | NOW Magazine The photographer’s sprawling collaboration with filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier will open simultaneously in Toronto and Ottawa The latest collaboration between photographer Edward Burtynsky and filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier is the Art Gallery of Ontario’s (AGO) major fall 2018 exhibit. The trio, who previously worked…

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[PRESS RELEASE] Art Gallery of Ontario and National Gallery of Canada to co-present major exhibitions detailing the impact of humans on Earth

November 15, 2017

Lithium Mines #1, Salt Flats, Atacama Desert, Chile, 2017. Inkjet print, 58 ½ x 78 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto. © Edward Burtynsky, 2017. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NOV. 15, 2017, 12 P.M. EST #AnthropoceneProject unveils new works by the artist collective of Edward Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier…

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Will Not Even the Humble Hedgehog Be Spared by the Anthropocene?

October 30, 2017

By Kelly Faircloth | Jezebel Did you know that there are hedgehogs in London? Well—for now. NBC News reports that London’s last breeding population of these prickly little buddies covered in salmonella—an icon of the British landscape—unfortunately lives awfully close to one of the staging areas of a $73 billion rail project: The construction of Britain’s High Speed…

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Corals eat plastic the way humans eat junk food — because it’s tasty

October 30, 2017

By Nicole Mortillaro | CBC News Plastics are abundant in our oceans. Now scientists have found that corals — which already face numerous threats and have declined on a staggering scale  — may be feeding on it not because it resembles prey, but because it actually tastes good to them. Corals are living organisms. Coral reefs are collections of…

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Human activity blamed for increase in right whale deaths: report

October 5, 2017

By Canadian Press | Global News CHARLOTTETOWN – Analysis of six endangered North Atlantic right whales found dead since June in the Gulf of St. Lawrence suggests four were struck by ships and one died caught in fishing gear, says a report released Thursday. The sixth was too decomposed to be sure. Preliminary findings of a…

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Assessing Agricultural Drought in the Anthropocene: A Modified Palmer Drought Severity Index

September 26, 2017

By Mingzhi Yang , Weihua Xiao * ,Yong Zhao * ,Xudong Li, Fan Lu,Chuiyu Lu and Yan Chen | Drought Monitoring, Forecasting, and Risk Assessment Abstract In the current human-influenced era, drought is initiated by natural and human drivers, and human activities are as integral to drought as meteorological factors. In large irrigated agricultural regions with high levels of human intervention, where the natural farmland soil moisture…

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Meet the Editor: Prof. Ian Townend, Anthropocene Coasts

September 17, 2017

The CSP Blog The Canadian Science Publishing family of journals grew this year with the introduction of Anthropocene Coasts, a new international, interdisciplinary open access journal.  Founding co-editor Prof. Ian Townend (University of Southampton) shared with us how global perspectives of how humans are impacting coastal ecosystems are needed to inform social, economic, and legal processes. …

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One of world’s largest marine parks created off coast of Easter Island

September 9, 2017

By Arthur Nelson | The Guardian  One of the world’s largest marine protection areas has been created off the coast of Easter Island. The 740,000 sq km Rapa Nui marine park is roughly the size of the Chilean mainland and will protect at least 142 endemic marine species, including 27 threatened with extinction. An astonishing 77% of the…

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The Anthropocene Will Help Astrobiologists Understand Alien Worlds

September 7, 2017

By Daniel Oberhaus | Motherboard “In our perspective, the beginning of the Anthropocene can be seen as the onset of the hybridization of the planet, a transitional stage from one class of planetary systems to another,” the researchers write in their paper. “From an astrobiological perspective, Earth’s entry into the Anthropocene represents what might be a…

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Alaska’s Permafrost is Melting

August 23, 2017

By Henry Fountain | The New York Times YUKON DELTA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, Alaska — The Arctic is warming about twice as fast as other parts of the planet, and even here in sub-Arctic Alaska the rate of warming is high. Sea ice and wildlife habitat are disappearing; higher sea levels threaten coastal native villages. But…

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These Tiny Beads Are Designed To Soak Up The Sunblock Chemical That’s Killing Coral

August 21, 2017

By Adele Peters | Fast Company  A tiny amount of oxybenzone, a UV-blocking chemical that’s commonly found in sunscreen, can stunt and deform the growth of coral reefs, sometimes killing the coral. In Hawaii, lawmakers are attempting to ban the sunscreens that contain the chemical so snorkelers don’t unwittingly destroy the reefs they visit. But until that happens–and until people…

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