Posts Tagged ‘Anthropocene’

Review: The Planet Enters a New, Uncertain Era in Anthropocene: The Human Epoch

By Steve Prokopy | Third Coast Reviews 3.5/4 ★ As difficult as it is to imagine, the Earth’s condition—both in terms of climate and physical characteristics—is not more a result of human shaping and interference than forces of nature. Everything from climate change, mass animal extinctions, strip mining, and countless other ways to ravage the…

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Elizabeth Jacobson reviews Anthropocene: The Human Epoch, film by Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de Pencier, and Edward Burtynsky

Terrain.org In Questions, Stephen Hawking notes that in January 2018 the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists moved the Doomsday Clock forward two minutes to midnight. It’s the Journal’s measurement of the imminence of catastrophe—military or environmental—facing our planet. The clock’s ticking toward midnight means that the Holocene epoch, which correlates with the expansion and effects of the human species…

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Ep. 4 — ‘Anthropocene’: Naming the climate crisis

TVO’s Word Bomb As the Earth responds ever more rapidly to human activity, a controversial group of scientists is proposing that we’ve entered a new epoch: the age of the Anthropocene. Pippa and Karina sit down with earth scientists and a documentary filmmaker [Nicholas de Pencier] to talk about how the crisis is packaged and…

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How Humans Have Changed the Earth’s Geology

Brut Media Humans are a relatively new addition to the earth, but we have changed geology more than any natural force. This epoch is called anthropocene — and it might be the last one. These changes to nature, caused by human alteration and are supported by overwhelming evidence, are referred to as the Anthropocene. “The…

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Anthropocene: The Human Epoch | Inside the Documentary

Popcorn Talk Join Frank Moran as he interviews filmmakers: Jennifer Baichwal, Nicholas de Pencier, and Edward Burtynsky. “Anthropocene” is defined as the current geological epoch in which humans are the primary cause of permanent planetary change. The upcoming documentary ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch is unflinching in its depiction of the destruction of the natural world,…

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The Wonders and Terrors of Humanity’s Impact on Earth

Phosphor Tailings Pond #4, Near Lakeland, Florida, USA 2012. A photograph by Edward Burtynsky from The Anthropocene Project

By Laura Leavitt | Hyperallergic Featuring stunning landscape photography, the documentary Anthropocene surveys a new era of human-driven geology. The cult film Koyaanisqatsi, named after the Hopi idea of “life lived out of balance,” contains no dialogue, but rather scenes all over the world — of cities, nature, the tiniest industrially produced products, and the vastness of canyons.…

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‘Anthropocene: The Human Epoch’ Review: Global Warnings

By Ben Kenigsberg | The New York Times “Anthropocene: The Human Epoch” puts a frightening twist on the standard nature documentary. Rather than exalting the awesome beauty of landscapes or animals, it captures alarming ways in which that beauty has been disturbed. The movie takes its cues from the research of the Anthropocene Working Group, a team of…

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DRAMATIC PHOTOS CAPTURE HOW HUMANS HAVE CHANGED THE EARTH

By Peter Carbonera | Newsweek Anthropocene: The Human Epoch is a documentary film by Edward Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier that paints a beautiful and terrifying picture of what human beings are doing to the Earth. Since the early 1980s Burtynsky, a Canadian photographer, has been documenting what he calls “intentional landscapes,” the big…

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An Artful Invocation

Muse Magazine A few months ago, I stepped inside one of my favourite places. As an Art History major, the AGO feels like nothing short of a home. During this final year of my studies, the topic of public engagement has been particularly relevant, especially as we broach discussions of what comes next for our…

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Anthropocene (Goose Lane Editions) Wins Canadian Museums Association Award

Tyrone Mine #3, Silver City, New Mexico, USA 2012. A photograph by Edward Burtynsky for The Anthropocene Project

Anthropocene (Goose Lane Editions, 2018) is the winner of Outstanding Achievement in Research in the art category by the Canadian Museums Association. The award, presented in Toronto on April 17th at the AMA’s 2019 National Conference, was the latest honour for the book, film and gallery project, which was deemed by judges as “nationally significant and exceeded the current standard of…

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Interview: Edward Burtynsky Finds New Perspectives on the Anthropocene

By Rachel MacFarlane | FORMAT Magazine The renowned Canadian photographer discusses his latest work, which uses AR, film, and photography to document environmental change. October has been a busy month for Edward Burtynsky. Most significantly, the Canadian artist released a new series of his photographs, titled Anthropocene, on until November 3 at Toronto’s Nicholas Metivier Gallery. With collaborators…

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Anthropocene Examines the Shocking Impact Humans Have on the Earth

By Truc Nguyen | NUVO Magazine This month, Anthropocene—a photography and multimedia art exhibition from artists Edward Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal, and Nicholas de Pencier—opens simultaneously at the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery of Canada, the first time the two museums have offered concurrent, complementary shows from the same artists. The Anthropocene Project also encompasses a feature documentary film arriving in theatres…

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